KEEPING THE SPIRIT ALIVE SINCE 1999

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Notice anything odd here?

11-Aug-20 /historicracing.com/tags

In the sixties South Africa enjoyed a thriving Formula One circus of it’s own. And one of it’s best remembered practitioners was Brausch Niemann. Not because he was especially talented – although he did appear to be half-sharp – but because he had a Lotus Seven. And by all accounts, a particularly tatty one.

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Flying Officer Dorothy Mabel Murray Stanley Turner who finished second in the Rudge Cup at Le Mans in her first season.

22-Jul-20 /historicracing.com/tags

Petite and determined with a cheeky sense of humour, Dorothy Stanley Turner was born on November 12th 1916, into a military family. Her father had an 'adventurous disposition'. While her father was a student he had taken part in the Graeco-Turkish war and been made a Knight of the Royal Order of Saviour of Greece for his services. 

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Animals in motor sport. Number 4 - Oscar

08-Jul-20 /historicracing.com/tags

James Hunt's dog Oscar at Turnberry Golf Club in Scotland. Photo courtesy of Peter Windsor

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Animals in motor sport. Number 3 - Boxer

25-Jun-20 /historicracing.com/tags

Boxer moved into the Cooper factory in the mid 1950s and apparently was fascinated by welding to the point that the mechanics made him his own pair of welding goggles!

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Animals in motor sport. Number 2 - Seal

22-Jun-20 /historicracing.com/tags
Pictured here is Seal, Innes Irelands black lab wearing one of his master's hats. Seal's involvement in motor sport was more as a companion than any direct involvement.
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Animals in motor sport. Number 1 - Bud

20-Jun-20 /historicracing.com/tags

With the passing of Lewis Hamilton's Bulldog Coco, hopefully she can meet up with another Bulldog, Bud. Bud was a young bulldog who joined the first coast to coast crossing of the USA back in 1903.

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The Duel in the Sun, the Monaco Grand Prix of 1933.

19-Jun-20 /Chris Bowen/tags

This was the first Grand Prix where grid positions were decided by the American sytem of practice time rather than by ballot. It was a race that would not be decided until the final lap with Achille Varzi and Tazio Nuvolari exchanging the  lead 21 times. Who said you can't overtake at Monaco!

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Gaston Chevrolet's Frontenac and Eddie O'Donnell's Duesenberg on the boards of the Los Angeles Speedway in Beverly Hills.

10-Jun-20 /historicracing.com/tags

It was the 25th of November 1920 and neither man would survive the race. Gaston was leading when the two of them collided as they tried to lap Joe Thomas.

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Alfonso de Portago was, until the arrival of the Alonso boy, the most successful Spanish driver in Formula 1.

01-Jun-20 /historicracing.com/tags

This is Don Alfonso Antonio Vicente Blas Angel Francisco Borija Cabez de Vaca y Leighton, Carvajal y Are, XVII Marqués de Portago, Marqués de Moratalla, XIII Conde de La Mejorada, Conde de Pernia, Duke of Alagon, Grande de Espana, known more usually as Alfonso de Portago or Fon to his friends.

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A famous photo. Major Braid’s contribution to an F3 race at Blandford Camp.

26-May-20 /historicracing.com/tags

Major Peter Braid began racing in 1949 with a Cooper Mk III. He turned out to be quite quick and won his first race in July at Silverstone. Another win followed in August at Great Auclum. A week later the circus moved to Blandford Camp in Dorset where in an earlier race Gordon Woods crashed his Frazer Nash BMW and was thrown out receiving head injuries that would sadly prove fatal later in hospital.

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The Tyrrell that never was!

22-May-20 /historicracing.com/tags

In the latter half of 1971, the late Derek Gardner penned this car for the 1972 season. A monocoque was bult and a full size mock up tested in the MIRA wind tunnel. It turned out to be "unstable in yaw" as Derek put it.

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A low flying 'Pechvogel' at Donnington in 1937

11-May-20 /historicracing.com/tags

Manfred Von Brauchitsch was the last surviving winner of a pre-war Grand Prix. Better known by his nickname "Der Pechvogel" (The Unlucky Bird) for the races he lost, his hard-driving impetuosity and his imperious Prussian officer-class mien, he was perhaps the least talented of Alfred Neubauer’s regular stars but, given he was racing with the likes of Rudolf Caracciola and Herrmann Lang, 'least tallented' is still probably still more tallented than most other drivers of the time.

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Things not to say before a race - I will win or die trying

05-May-20 /historicracing.com/tags
José Estrada was one of Mexico's top drivers. Nicknamed 'Ché' he had started racing in the 1930s. Married with two children he was taking part in the second running of the Carrera Panamericana at the age of 51. 
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Nice motor mate! Presenting Ike Eichelberger and his home built Keil-Porsche special at Virginia International Raceway in 1969.

27-Apr-20 /historicracing.com/tags

The Keil (German for “Wedge”) was actually very much more sophisticated than it looked. And let’s be honest. It kind of had to be! It was in point of fact, an early attempt at active aerodynamics. Based on an old Elva chassis, the entire bodywork of the Keil was hinged just in front of the dashboard.

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Francis Richard Henry Penn Curzon, 5th Earl Howe, CBE, PC, VD (Not an STD but Volunteer Decoration) - the 'Old Man'.

22-Apr-20 /historicracing.com/tags

Howe sporting his cloth cap which he even wore to Parliament with his 1927 1.5 litre DelageFrancis Richard Henry Penn Curzon, 5th Earl Howe, CBE was born in May 1884 in Mayfair, London. After school he followed the family tradition of joining the Royal Navy and served his country during the First World War seeing action in Turkey, Greece, France and Belgium. He also served as ADC (aide-de-camp) to King George V.

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To have your hair tweaked by a Grand Prix legend, would imply that you are a man of some standing within the industry..

14-Apr-20 /historicracing.com/tags

And in this case, that would be so. For this is Rob Walker. Stirling Moss’s sometime employer, and the greatest privateer ever to enter the sweaty arena of the Motor Racing World Championship.

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We would like to present to you the amazing 25,422cc Darracq V8 Land Speed Record car.

09-Apr-20 /Chris Bowen/tags

Properly known as the Darracq 200 (for 200hp), here it is in its natural habitat, with owner Sir Algernon Lee Guinness (far left) at Saltburn sands in Yorkshire, sometime around 1908. Typically, the local Bluebottles have also got in on the act.

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The Italian Grand Prix. Monza 1971.

19-Mar-20 /Chris Bowen/tags

We were all mightily impressed by the legendary Villeneuve/Arnoux battle at Dijon in 1979 weren’t we? Repeat: Yes we were. But we’re here to tell you that it was nothing…Nada… Zilch…Rien du tout!...In comparison with the Italian Grand Prix of 1971. This would be the last Grand Prix ever held at Monza before the venerable venue sprouted its first chicane and straight-line speed would be paramount.

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This is Ray Keech going for the World Land Speed Record at Daytona in 1928.

19-Mar-20 /historicracing.com/tags

The enormous White-Triplex Special had three V/12 Liberty engines with a total engine capacity of 81-litres. It was as monstrous to drive as it looked. Lee Bible, the chief mechanic, wanting to make his mark on the World, expressed an interest in driving the monster. The barrel-roll that followed certainly left the required mark, did nothing for his record chances and simply lead to a text-book display of how such flamboyant behaviour may so easily result in one’s personal dust allocation becoming substantially and with finite implications.....bitten.

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This rather trustworthy looking chap goes by the name of Georges Boillot.

03-Sep-19 /historicracing.com/tags
Famed for his fast and fearless driving, Georges emerged in the early 1900s as the leading driver of Robert Peugeot’s Lion-Peugeot Voiturette team. And when Lion-Peugeot were absorbed into the senior Peugeot company, the racing team and its drivers went too.
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These are the 1955 F1 DB-Panhards at Pau in 1955, possibly the most useless cars ever to start a 1st class Formula 1 event!

14-Dec-18 /historicracing.com/tags
Charles Deutsch and Rene Bonnet founded their imaginatively named DB marque in the late thirties, and rapidly built up a reputation for building lightweight, small-engined sport racers. Usually with close attention paid to the aerodynamics. Citroen were the providers of the motive power for the early models, but from the late forties the brand became synonymous with Panhard’s lightweight flat-twin unit (initially containing only 600cc), and it’s accompanying Front-Wheel Drive transmission system.
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Giancarlo Baghetti, arguably the first and only person to win his very first F1 World Championship Grand Prix

26-May-17 /historicracing.com/tags

As we said he is arguably regarded as the only driver to win his first World Championship Grand Prix, though technically he is joined by two others; Nino Farina who won the very first round of the very first World Championship in 1950 (whoever won that race would have won his first ever World Championship Grand Prix) and Johnnie Parsons who won the Indy 500 that same year at a time when it was included as a round of the World Championship.

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Maurice Trintignant driving his Scuderia Centro-Sud Cooper-Climax to work in 1960

10-Apr-17 /Chris Bowen/tags

Work in this case being the United States GP at Riverside. Trintignant is easily recognised by his trademark bobble-hat. Which proves that Frenchmen are just as capable of dressing badly, as everyone else.

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So come on now…What do you think was the worst Formula 1 car ever built?

07-Apr-17 /historicracing.com/tags

Was it the 750cc, supercharged DB-Panhard from 1955? The only front-wheel-drive Formula One car ever to have actually raced or the gloriously incompetent, W/12 engined, Life that kept us all amused and bemused throughout the 1990 season.

One might consider the long forgotten Shannon-Emery which ground it’s exhausts along the track all around it’s only lap of it’s only Grand Prix, in the hands of former Team Lotus driver, Trevor Taylor, at Brands Hatch back in 1966.

Or maybe the Maki F102 of 1976? The only car ever to have been disqualified from a Grand Prix because the other teams thought it was so dangerously built they didn't want to share the track with it!

We could, of course, very easily go on however.....

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In 1952 Ferrari went to Indianapolis and...........they were rubbish!

07-Apr-17 /historicracing.com/tags

This adventure began in 1951, when the Grant Piston Ring company enquired of the possibility of acquiring a couple of second-hand Grand Prix cars for use in the following year’s Indy 500.

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Karl Kling and Hans Klenk at the 1952 Carrera Panamericana

07-Apr-17 /historicracing.com/tags

Here we have Karl Kling (right) and Hans Klenk in their Mercedes-Benz 300SL on the 1952 Carrera Panamericana.

Of all the mad races that ever were, the Carrera Panamericana ranked amongst the maddest. A nine-stage, five day road race, inaugurated in 1950 to commemorate the opening of the Mexican section of the Pan-American Highway. It ran almost the entire length of Mexico, combining sections of mountain switchback with enormously fast lengths of flat straight road. All with the added colour of precipitous ravines and goat-infested villages.

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